Composition Students’ End of Year Concert

April 26th 2015, 8pm

D.B. Clarke Theater

Concordia-Logo-Faculty-FA-ALT-Music-cmyk

Benjamin Goldman

Make Believe

Animated short soundtrack

What if we could bring magic to the world simply by changing the way we face our hardships? Make Believe is an homage to creativity, and a contemplation of what a real-life “happy ending” could look like. Imagination might not solve problems, but it sure can help us face them!

Make Believe was my undergraduate film, made with a mixture of 3D environments and 2D digital animation. With music by Benjamin Goldman and sound design by myself (Patricia Granato) and Arthur Chen, the film tells the story of a man who once gave hope to his little brother through the magic of imagination and must now find the strength to do the same for himself.

– Patricia Granato

For more information about the composer, check out www.benjamingoldmanmusic.com.

Ben Neelin

Høme

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

Høme is a string quartet by Quebec songwriter, poet and composer Benjamin Neelin and is a response to the indie game Among the Sleep by Krillbite Studio, which places the player in the role of a four year old who is experiencing the terrors of his own home late at night. The piece is intended to give a sense of familiarity mixed with a quiet but prevalent terror that waits just at the edge of the mind, but never emerges. The piece takes its atmosphere from stories like The Nameless City by H.P. Lovecraft, 1408 by Stephen King and the horror short Lights Out, winner of ‘Best Short’ at FANT Bilbao 2014.

Danielle Savage

The weather didn’t matter (we threw our food upon the floor)

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

On a foggy morning, the bucket-on a-hook sways with the motion of the boat on the waves. Inside the bucket are some tarnished coins, an empty mead bottle, and an old shirt which smells of sweat and salty air. A foghorn sounds in the distance, which rouses the boat’s rat (Rubbydo) who then crawls up on the mast to have a look around. A Great Cormorant (a bird from the family of Cormorants – excellent fishers), whose name is Pete, is sitting beside him. Though they are of a different species, their relative similar size coupled with strangeness they feel towards humans proves to be an oddly bonding element between them. Although you wouldn’t catch them physically cuddling, in the early a.m. like this you can almost always find them sitting next to each other, watching the boat, and monitoring the sea. All the scavengers (12 of them) are asleep, last nights food is on the floor. The booty that was found the last time the ship docked is strewn all over the tables, the floor, and down in the belly of the ship. Obviously, these things were not acquired in Newfoundland (they are currently near the Avalon Peninsula), but in more southern waters. They have covered a lot of ground in the part 2 weeks. Newfoundland, even with the all the fog, is everyone’s favorite summer sail.

The scavengers generally find themselves between here, the Carolinas, the Florida Keys, and Cuba. How they navigate so often between the US and Cuba, what with the embargo that has yet to be lifted, is a mystery to outsiders. Actually, most of how the ship operates and manages to function is a bit of a mystery to those not aboard. Only 2 of the crew ever had any “formal” sailing training, yet all of them appear adept, not only at sailing, diving, and fishing, but also at dodging marine authorities and docking in places where they don’t have to pay a dime, which is highly unusual in places like Key West, where every good bit of shoreline has been overrun with for-profit marinas. That is, unless you want to moor, which they often do as well, and then swim or canoe to shore.

The morning feels oddly solemn, but that won’t last. Once they wake up, personalities will once again begin to clash. People talk of cabin fever- the ship is enough to convince one that the term was invented for it. Bottles will soon be thrown, hardened glares exchanged, meals will be cooked, fishing lines dropped, seaweed dove for, and the balcony gardens tended to. The day will build up a critical mass of energy until, once again, it gives way to nightfall, which is an unpredictable entity all its own, out here on open waters. Then unfailingly (weather permitting, of course), dances will be executed on tables, which are as much about shaking off the pent-up fervor as they are about contributing to a sense of mirth which is oddly present more evenings then not. Despite the tensions that inevitably present themselves when you put more that one human in a confined space, those aboard have a sense of poetry and share a fatalistic sense of humor which leads them to go on dancing, scavenging, and making up stories.  And to, despite their differences, take care of each other.

There are at least 3 excellent accordion players aboard this boat, and everyone knows how to stomp or shout a tune. But not yet. Its too early for that. The fog is lifting, the mood is tinged with melancholy, and the sea is a little rough this morning….

Pierre-Yves Thériault

L’Océan Infini

Stéphanie Brassard, voice
Georges Dimitrov, piano

L’Océan Infini is the first piano/voice piece from the Québec-born composer Pierre-Yves Thériault. This work was strongly inspired by The Prophet, a book of 26 prose poetry essays written by the Lebanese artist, philosopher and writer Kahlil Gibran, published in 1923 by Alfred A. Knopf. Considered by many as one of the great writings of the 20th century, The Prophet is Gibran’s best known work. Translated into over forty different languages, this work is still nowadays one of the best sellers every year at Amazon.com. Originally written in English, the French transcription used for this piece was translated by Janine Levy.

The piece takes place as the young Al-Moustapha is about to board a ship which will carry him to his homeland after a 12 years stay in the foreign city of Orphalese. The passage used in the piece depicts how the young man, while searching the horizon for his vessel, reacts when he sees the ship approaching the shores, coming in from the infinite ocean. For the purpose of the piece, the text was translated to a feminine perspective.

 Jean-Philippe Kaya

Ballade No. 1

Jean-Philippe Kaya, piano

Isaac Rosen-Purcell

Oh, the Old Nick Nak Out Back

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

Oh, The Old Nick Nak Out Back reminds the Isaac of the back yard of a Collector of specific yet random things.

Isaac Rosen Purcell is a composer of music, theatre, dance and also Performer of all sorts!

Antoine Dewatre

Buster Keaton

Antoine Dewatre, guitar and voice
?, voice
?, flute
Taryn Boudreau, clarinet
Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

 

Intermission

Josh Feldman

Three Pianos

Tram Minh Nguyen, piano
Georges Dimitrov, piano
Liselyn Adams, piano

Three Pianos uses the superimposition of three tempi – one for each piano. It uses simple, repetitive patterns, so that the rhythmic effect may be more easily apprehended by the listener. The patterns develop by means of changing accent structure, dynamics and register.

Kyla Smith

Evening Escapade

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

Evening Escapade is a small, one-movement piece based off of a single theme in A minor. The bulk of the piece was composed using extended tonality and is inspired by Shostakovich. I dedicate this piece to Christopher Smith for teaching me almost everything I know about Finale and helping me become the musician I am today.

Nicholas Nausbaum

External Quartet

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

Bernardo Alvarado

When I Kissed You (The Moon Princess)

Vanessa Ascher, flute
Taryn Boudreau, clarinet
Samuel Anatole Blanchet, guitar
Samuel Hogue, violin
Jorge Flores, conductor

“Cuando te besé” (“When I kissed you”). The piece talks about the inherent fear we feel in our culture when falling in love, caused by the sensation of vulnerability that comes with this experience. As a solution to overcome this fear I explore the idea that, since inevitably one day we will die, we must try to enjoy love even though it makes us feel vulnerable; we must learn to accept vulnerability. This piece is a representation of the mental processes from the moment of the first love encounter, followed by the fear, the introspection, and then finally, the resolution.

Jason Kellner

Homage No. 1

Georges Dimitrov, piano

This piece is an homage, or pastiche, which was inspired by the prolific French composer Erik Satie, whose minimalistic style of writing influenced the creation of this piece and countless others in the 20th and 21st century. The work exploits the themes of sorrow, adversity, and hardship, but also of happiness and bliss.

Maria Cooper

High Tide

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

 

Thomas V. Christie

String Quartet No. 1, “Pour Jeanne et sa mère”

Josh Zubolt, violin
Emily Redhead, violin
Jennifer Thiessen, viola
J.-C. Lizotte, cello

Written in response to the early passing of Jeanne’s mother.

Tram Minh Nguyen

Tiny Suite in 3 Dissections

I. Obvious
II. Oblivious
III. A Sam for Moon

Teresa Wang, violin
Armelle Supervie, percussion
Tram Minh Nguyen, piano
Georges Dimitrov, piano
Dylan Ross Abre, programming

(Excerpt from program notes)
…..Oblivious :  Flying butts are every where in the garden / They eat grass and their humps start to grow grassy hairs/ Grassy-hair butts dancing so high that the moon begins to shatter / Its cry is heard by Grassargflea, whose mum is a palindrome/ So just a touch can wake up all tiny hero chirrupburps / they are all shooting at black holes while dream-walking on the existence of the white hole / ..cha cha huff huff.. chaka ..humm… … Tram Minh Nguyen
….Featured Artist :
Teresa Wang, a winner of the 13/14 Concerto Competition from the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra (TSYO) and a former TSYO concertmaster, is back on stage tonight to perform Tram NG ‘s very demanding composition, Tiny Suite in 3 Dissections.
“A unique musician, who has played my piece with astounding creativity” — Tram NG.